Denton County Commissioners Recognize Wakeland Senior Thomas Davies

Denton County Commissioners Recognize Wakeland Senior Thomas Davies

Thomas Davies accepting the Court Proclamation. (L-R) Commissioners Ron Marchant and Ryan Williams, Judge Andy Eads, and Commissioners Bobbie J. Mitchell and Dianne Edmondson.

 

Thomas Davies, a Wakeland High School senior, was recognized at the Denton County Commissioners Court on September 21, 2021, for being an American Legion Boys Nation Senator. Davies was the guest of Commissioner Precinct 1 Ryan Williams.

Davies was selected by American Legion Peter J Courcy Post 178. He, along with eighteen other delegates, attended the 2021 Texas Boys State. Davies was also selected as a senator from the more than six hundred Texas Boys State Statesmen to attend the 2021 American Legion Boys Nation in Washington, DC.  Davies was one of one hundred Boys Nation senators selected from more than 20,000 Boys State Statesmen from across our great nation.

In Washington, senators received an education on the structure and function of federal government, introduced legislation, organized party platforms and conventions, and participated in the election of officers. The week of government training also combined lectures and forums with visits to federal agencies, institutions, memorials, and historical spots in and around Washington.

Judge Andy Eads read the proclamation which was approved by Commissioners Ryan Williams, Ron Marchant, Bobbie J. Mitchell, and Dianne Edmondson. The proclamation recognized Davies for his outstanding achievements and extended best wishes for continued success, happiness, and a lifetime of honor and service.

U.S. AIR FORCE BIRTHDAY

U.S. AIR FORCE BIRTHDAY

The Air Force Birthday on September 18th commemorates the establishment of The United States Air Force. From the moment the Wright brothers found a way to soar with the birds, the military incorporated aeronautical pursuits into their missions. However, the Air Force did not become a separate branch of the Armed Forces until September 18, 1947.

The military established the Signal Corps as the first aeronautical force in the United States. During the Civil War, the first missions provided visional communications via flags and torchlight from aerial balloons. Even so, the Signal Corps did not become an official branch of the Army until 1863. Its creation made way for more aeronautical training and study.

Since then, military air service has gone through many names and commands. A few examples are Air Service of the US Army to the Air Corps and Army Air Force. Finally, in 1947, President Truman signed the National Security Act establishing the United States Air Force as a separate branch of the military.

As a result of pursuing advanced technology and superior airmen, the US Air Force emerged as the swiftest tactical force ready to deploy anywhere at a moment’s notice. On September 18, celebrate the airmen and women who are on watch every

POW / MIA Recognition Day

POW / MIA Recognition Day

You Are Not Forgotten – that’s the central phrase behind the POW/MIA remembrance movement which honors America’s prisoners of war, those who are still missing in action and their families. Many of our service members suffered as prisoners of war during several decades of varying conflicts. While some of them made it home, tens of thousands more never did.

POW/MIA Recognition Day is commemorated on the third Friday of every September, a date that is not associated with any particular war. In 1979, Congress and the president passed resolutions making it official after the families of the more than 2,500 Vietnam War POW/MIAs pushed for full accountability.

The point of POW/MIA Recognition Day is to ensure that American remembers to stand behind those who serve and to make sure we do everything we can to account for those who have never returned

To comprehend the importance of this movement, all one needs to do is look at the sheer number of Americans who have been listed as POW/MIAs.

Prisoners of War:

  • 130,201 World War II service members were imprisoned; 14,072 them died
  • 7,140 Korean War service members were imprisoned; 2,701 of them died
  • 725 Vietnam War service members were imprisoned; 64 of them died
  • 37 service members were imprisoned during conflicts since 1991, including both Gulf wars; none are still in captivity

Missing in Action (83,114):

  • 73,515 from World War II
  • 7,841 from the Korean War
  • 1,626 from Vietnam
  • 126 from the Cold War
  • 6 from conflicts since 1991

About 75 percent of those missing Americans are somewhere in the Asia-Pacific. More than 41,000 have been presumed lost at sea. Efforts to find those men, identify them, and bring them home are constant.

Constitution Day and Citizenship Day

Constitution Day and Citizenship Day

On September 17, 1787, the Founding Fathers signed the U.S. Constitution. For the past 225 years, the Constitution has served as the supreme law of the land. The Constitution, along with the Bill of Rights and other amendments, define our government and guarantee our rights.

Each year, on September 17, Americans celebrate Constitution Day and Citizenship Day. In addition, September 17-23 is also recognized as Constitution Week. During this time, Americans are encouraged to reflect on the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and what it means to be a U.S. citizen.

American Legion Day

American Legion Day

The American Legion has served wartime veterans through promoting patriotism, military service, national security, and dedication to current service members and veterans alike.

The American Legion will celebrate its 101st birthday on Monday, September 16, 2021.

The Legion itself holds events nationwide to celebrate its birthday. All focus on the organization’s mission, core values, plus recognizing both volunteers and those they help. These events promote the Legion’s advocacy for veterans, patriotism, and what the Legion describes as “Americanism.”

PATRIOT DAY AND NATIONAL DAY OF SERVICE AND REMEMBRANCE – September 11

PATRIOT DAY AND NATIONAL DAY OF SERVICE AND REMEMBRANCE – September 11

September 11 marks a tragic day in U.S. history, but the date has also been chosen to honor those who lost their lives in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

Patriot Day honors the memory of the nearly 3,000 innocent victims who died in the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Each year Americans dedicate this day to remembering those who died and to the first responders who risked their own lives to save others.

On December 18, 2001, President George W. Bush officially designated September 11th as Patriot Day.

The day has also been designated as a day that the U.S. flag should be flown at half-staff from sunrise to sundown, not just until noon as is done on Memorial Day. In addition, the people of the United States are asked to observe a moment of silence on Patriot Day in remembrance of the victims

Labor Day

Labor Day

Labor Day pays tribute to the contributions and achievements of American workers and is traditionally observed on the first Monday in September. It was created by the labor movement in the late 19th century and became a federal holiday in 1894.

Labor Day is still celebrated in cities and towns across the United States with parades, picnics, barbecues, fireworks displays and other public gatherings. For many Americans, particularly children and young adults, it represents the end of the summer and the start of the back-to-school

VJ Day

VJ Day

On August 14, 1945, it was announced that Japan had surrendered unconditionally to the Allies, effectively ending World War II. Since then, both August 14 and August 15 have been known as “Victory over Japan Day,” or simply “V-J Day.” The term has also been used for September 2, 1945, when Japan’s formal surrender took place aboard the U.S.S. Missouri, anchored in Tokyo Bay. Coming several months after the surrender of Nazi Germany, Japan’s capitulation in the Pacific brought six years of hostilities to a final and highly anticipated close.

National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

September is National Suicide Prevention Month. During this month, mental health professionals and advocates work to prevent suicide. Efforts are not only dedicated to preventing the rate of suicide, but also to help communities who are at a greater risk for committing suicide.

Veterans, for example, are at a much higher risk for developing mental health conditions that often go untreated and lead to this tragic result. Now more than ever it’s important to give emotional support to veterans. We need to keep our veterans safe.

Studies show that suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. The typical state suicide rate for veterans is typically much higher than the general population. This means that, on average, the proportion of casualties for suicidal veterans is greater than non-service members who commit suicide in our country.

These statistics are shocking, considering that suicide can be prevented with enough awareness and the right resources for those struggling. There are countless factors that contribute to suicidal thoughts and acts for veterans. Things like combat exposure, substance abuse, injury, struggle to return to civilian life, and military sexual drama all add to the risk of self-harm and committing suicide.

The truth of the matter is that a large majority of veterans experience all these factors and more because of the nature of their jobs. By serving the country, veterans often put others’ safety above their own. This is exactly why having resources in place for veterans to seek preventative and active mental health care is so essential in preventing suicide.

Knowing the signs of mental health issues like PTSD, substance abuse, and the risk of suicide can be challenging. Keep an eye out for the following mood or behavioral changes:

  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Making risky, impulsive decisions
  • New or worsening mental illness symptoms
  • Misuse of drugs (illicit or prescribed) and alcohol

Always seek help right away if you or someone you know is currently unsafe. Connect with the Veterans Crisis Line at 1-800-273-8255 to reach caring and qualified responders. 

Whether Veterans are looking for clinical care, counseling, assistance with benefits, or something else, local and national tools and resources are available at the Veterans Crisis Line website.

National Service Dog Month

National Service Dog Month

September is National Service Dog Month, a time marked to pay tribute to the animals who support Americans with special training to help with people dealing with vision impairment, medical issues, mental health, and many other areas.

service dog is trained for as long as two years at an expense that can reach as high as $40,000. The training for service dogs varies depending on the emphasis. Medical alert dogs will have different skill sets than those who assist people with unrelated medical issues.

There is no single breed of preferred service dog. They can be large or small, they can be especially bred for service or they can be sourced as rescue dogs. There are dogs trained to help the visually impaired, those with PTSD, and much more.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can occur when an individual experiences a traumatic event like combat, military sexual trauma, violence, and terrorism. It is normal for most people to have a stress reaction after a traumatic experience. But, if the reaction doesn’t dissipate or begins to disrupt daily life, then you may have PTSD. According to the National Center for PTSD, eight out of every 100 veterans have PTSD.

If you or a fellow comrade is struggling with PTSD, here are nine organizations that can help:
Military OneSource
National Alliance on Mental Illness
PTSD United
Give an Hour
BraveHeart: Welcome Back Veterans Southeast Initiative
PTSD Foundation of America
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
National Resource Directory

Suffering from PTSD can be a lonely and isolating experience. The first step to getting well and learning how to manage your symptoms is to ask for help. There is absolutely no shame in admitting that you may not be able to cope by yourself. Know that you are not alone and use these resources to contact professionals who are ready to help.