United States ARMY 246th Birthday

United States ARMY 246th Birthday

Every year on June 14th, the United States Army celebrates its creation in 1775.

Formed from amateur troops of volunteer soldiers defending colonies against British tyranny, the oldest military force in the United States began before the U.S. formally existed. Their forces consisted of mostly inexperienced militiamen commanded by independent colonial armies.

According to resources, there were never more than 48,000 Continental soldiers at one time.  Today, the United States Army consists of over one million active-duty service members and an additional 800,000 National Guard and Reserves members.  It is the largest branch in the U.S. military.

The enduring history of the U.S. Army means it has been integral to many of the United States military, peace-keeping, and humanitarian efforts. It has operated or helped to facilitate humanitarian operations in many other countries and provided civil engineering and modernization projects in nations that need certain types of infrastructure.

The evolution of the U.S. Army also has included changes in the demographics of those who serve; from an exclusively male active-duty force to a diverse and multicultural force that is far more representative of the American population than in previous decades.

US Army Reserve Birthday

US Army Reserve Birthday

The United States Army Reserve celebrates its 113th birthday in 2021. That century-plus milestone is a significant achievement for what the Army Reserve official site describes as “the most capable, combat-ready, and lethal Federal Reserve force in the history of the Nation” and while the United States Marine Corps Reserve might take a bit of exception to that statement, there is no denying that the Army Reserve has played an important role in American military history.

The Army Reserve celebrates its contributions to two World Wars, the Cold War, Korea, Vietnam, Persian Gulf War, and many other missions.

There are Army Reserve communities located in every state in the Union, plus the District of Columbia, Guam, American Samoa, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Reservists have deployed to roughly 30 countries.

Today the U.S. Army Reserve rotates its part-time troops through active-duty mobilizations and monthly training. Some are categorized as “Army Reserve troop program units,” some serve as Individual Mobilization Augmentees (IMA), and still others are placed as non-drilling Individual Ready Reserve members. Army Reservists also have the option to serve on active-duty status known as AGR or Active Guard/Reserve status.

The role of the Army Reserve is more critical than ever in an age characterized by the persistent presence of asymmetric threats of terrorism and radical groups as well as the emerging, dynamic, and highly contentious challenges presented by potential adversaries with the capability, propensity, and willingness to contest America’s military power in all domains.” The Army Reserve continues to play an important part in national defense, humanitarian outreach, and combat operations.

Veterans History Project

Veterans History Project

The Veterans History Project collects, preserves, and makes accessible the firsthand accounts of American wartime veterans so that future generations may learn about veterans’ experiences in their own words to better understand the realities of war. The United States Congress created the Veterans History Project (VHP) in 2000, and the project is overseen and archived by the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress (LOC).

All veterans who reside in the 26th Congressional District are encouraged to register to be interviewed for the Veterans History Project. Interviews will be conducted every Tuesday at U.S. Congressman Michael Burgess’ Lake Dallas district office.

You can sign up by submitting your interview request to Congressman Burgess’ office by mail, email, or by calling his district office at 940-497-5031. (If you are unsure of your residency, please check here.)

The Project collects first-hand accounts of U.S. Veterans from the following wars:

  • World War, 1914-1918
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • Cold War
  • Korean War, 1950-1953
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975
  • Grenada–History–American Invasion, 1983
  • Panama–History–American Invasion, 1989
  • Operation Restore Hope, 1992-1993
  • Persian Gulf War, 1991
  • United Nations Operation in Somalia
  • Haiti–History–American intervention, 1994-1995
  • Operation Allied Force, 1999
  • Peacekeeping forces–Bosnia and Hercegovina
  • Operation Joint Guardian, 1999-
  • War on Terrorism, 2001-2009
  • Afghan War, 2001-
  • Iraq War, 2003-2011

In addition, U.S. citizen civilians who were actively involved in supporting war efforts (such as war industry workers, USO workers, flight instructors, medical volunteers, etc.) also are invited to share their valuable stories.

Note: This post does not constitute an endorsement of U.S. Congressman Michael Burgess on the part of the American Legion or its members.

Pack 12 Wolf Den's Hometown Hero Award

Pack 12 Wolf Den earned their Hometown Hero Award by learning about their Hometown Heroes, their jobs, what they did and what they loved about their job. The Hometown Heroes consisted of Army and Navy recruiters, American Legion Post veterans, Frisco PD and Frisco Fire.

Pack 12 Wolf Den's Hometown Hero Award
Pack 12 Wolf Den Cub Scouts, left to right: Hudson Brassfield Ethan Schuller JP crosier.

American Legion Post 178 members attending were L-R Ed Mendlik, Stuart Sax, James Trombley & Dave Fautheree.

Armed Forces Day

President Harry S. Truman led the effort to establish a single holiday for citizens to come together and thank our military members for their patriotic service in support of our country.

AFD2018

On August 31, 1949, Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson announced the creation of an Armed Forces Day to replace separate Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force Days. The single day celebration stemmed from the unification of the Armed Forces under the Department of Defense.

Post Namesake Memorial Anniversary

May he be forever remembered!

Army Cpl. Peter J. Courcy

Died February 2009 Serving in Operation Enduring Freedom


22, of Frisco, Texas; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky.; died Feb. 10 in Salerno, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle.


From an article by Chris Smith of The Leaf-Chronicle

Two 101st Airborne Division soldiers died Tuesday when an improvised explosive device exploded near their vehicle in Salerno, Afghanistan.

Spc. Peter J. Courcy, 22, of Frisco, Texas, and Pfc. Jason R. Watson, 19, of Many, La., died in Salerno from their injuries, according to a news release Thursday from the Department of Defense.

The soldiers were assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, based at Fort Campbell.

According to a Fort Campbell media release, Courcy was an infantryman who entered the Army in July 2006 and arrived at Fort Campbell in March 2007. His awards and decorations include: the Army Achievement Medal; National Defense Service Medal; Global War on Terrorism Service Medal; Army Service Ribbon; Air Assault Badge; Parachutist Badge and Weapons Qualification, M4, expert.

Courcy is survived by his wife, Mara, of Colony, Texas; son, Anthony Luke, of Frisco, Texas; mother and step-father, Mary and Christopher Bush, of Frisco, Texas; and father, Jon Mitchell.


From The Associated Press

Peter J. Courcy’s best friend, Otto Bauer, laughed as he remembered meeting Peter in 2001 on a school bus.

“He was one of a kind, and we just hit it off right away and quickly became close,” Bauer said. “He was always a goofy kid and had a strong personality.”

Courcy, 22, of Frisco, Texas, was killed Feb. 10 by a suicide car bomb in Salerno. He was assigned to Fort Campbell.

Courcy’s former principal remembers his upbeat presence and fervor for life. “He was a good student, but he was an even better person,” Rick Burnett said. “That was reflective in the fact that he served his country.”

After graduating in 2004, he played amateur hockey for the Dallas Ice Hawks while taking classes at community colleges until enlisting in 2006.

“We always knew that’s what he wanted and needed,” said his father, Chris. “He needed to be in the Army just as much as the Army needed him, and he thrived there.”

He was a Dallas Cowboys nut and signed on for another five years of service, hoping to join the Special Forces.