Air Force Reserve Birthday

Air Force Reserve Birthday

The United States Air Force Reserve celebrates its birthday every year on April 14, but according to the Air Force official site, Air Force Reservists can trace their heritage all the way back to the National Defense Act of 1916.

Reservists in every branch are an important part of the Department of Defense’s strategy for manpower, global reach, and military flexibility. The Air Force Reserve has approximately 450 aircraft, with a great deal of additional aircraft options thanks to the practice of the “associate wing” organization that allows active duty and Reserve components to co-locate flying operations.

The Air Force Reserve is not specifically focused solely on flying missions. Reserve forces include (but are not limited to) medical, civil engineering, intel, space force-type operations, and security.

The Air Force Reserve was created on April 14, 1948 soon after the establishment of the Air Force as a separate branch of service.  Before the creation of a separate Air Force, the Army Air Corps flew America’s combat missions, and that organization had its own Reservists. They were transferred wholesale to the Air Force.

1970 brought something called the Total Force Concept, which meant changes in the mission and use of the Air Force Reserve. Concept became policy in 1973; the Air Force Reserve became a multiple mission force flying the same aircraft as active-duty forces.

In the 1980s, there was a push to modernize and expand the Air Force Reserve program. Reservists began flying KC-10 tanker aircraft mid-air refueling missions, plus fighter jet missions in the F-16. The Reserve force would be an important part of both Gulf War missions and that era marked a new chapter in the Reserve force as it became utilized more and more to extend the effectiveness of the total force.

In the aftermath of September 11, Air Force Reserve crews were instrumental in air combat patrol missions in American airspace; those missions included both fighter jet operations and tanker air refueling missions. The present-day Air Force Reserve force includes more than 70,000 Americans serving worldwide.

National Former Prisoner of War Recognition Day

National Former Prisoner of War Recognition Day

National Former Prisoner of War Recognition Day on April 9th honors the courageous men and women who endured brutal treatment at the hands of their captors. As a result, they also suffered separation from family and displayed incredible endurance and faith during their captivity.

On this day in 1942, the largest number of U.S. Forces were captured by Japanese troops in the Bataan Peninsula in the Philippines. After battling through extreme conditions and prolonged battles, the captured troops were forced to march 65 miles to the prison camp. Without medical attention, food or water thousands died. The mistreatment continued for those who survived the brutal journey. In the compounds, deep in the unfamiliar jungle, the hardships, brutality, and suffering lasted more than two years for those who could survive.

Since the Revolutionary War, over half a million service members have been captured. This number does not reflect those lost or never recovered. However, each POW endures conditions much like the ones described above. These heroes deserve a day of recognition.

In 1984, a movement led by former POWs began seeking a day recognizing for former Prisoners of War on April 9th each year. In 1988, Congress approved legislation setting April 9th to commemorate the date the tragic number of captives were taken prisoner on Bataan. President Ronald Reagan proclaimed National Former Prisoners of War Recognition Day on April 1, 1988, through Presidential Proclamation 5788. He set the observance for April 9, 1988. Since then, through legislation and Presidential Proclamations, the observance carries on.  These men and women deserve our respect and profound gratitude.

Gold Star Spouses Day

Gold Star Spouses Day

The terms Gold Star family, Gold Star Spouses, and Gold Star Wives traditionally refer to the surviving loved ones of military members killed in the line of duty in combat. Gold Star Spouses Day was created to honor these loved ones.

This recognition of the sacrifices made by military spouses is a memorial for the fallen, a day of remembrance for the survivors, and an appreciation for those who are sometimes in danger of being overlooked for their support and service to the country.

The Gold Star is a tradition that began during World War One; service flags were flown by military families during this time, with blue stars for every family member serving in uniform. If one died, the blue star was replaced by a gold star. This allowed members of the community to know the price that the family had paid in the cause of freedom.

The tradition of Gold Star Spouses Day began in the early part of the 20th century as Gold Star Mother’s Day, observed on the last Sunday of September beginning in 1936. An organization known as Gold Star Wives began operating before the end of the Second World War, and the Gold Star lapel button tradition was established in the summer of 1947.

All of this set the stage for Gold Star Spouses Day, which began as Gold Star Wives Day-the first of which occurred in December 2010. Two years later a Senate resolution codified Gold Star Wives Day, observed on April 5 each year.  Today the event is known as Gold Star Spouses Day, though many still use “Gold Star Wives Day” interchangeably with Gold Star Spouses Day.

If you know any surviving spouse of any person of the United States military who died while a member of the armed forces of our country, or who died after such service because of an injury or disability incurred during such service, please extend your heartfelt gratitude.

Veteran Rapid Retraining Assistance Program

Veteran Rapid Retraining Assistance Program

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is preparing to launch the Veteran Rapid Retraining Assistance Program (VRRAP) as part of its continued effort to support Veterans seeking retraining and economic opportunities in response to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

VA in partnership with the Department of Labor published a list of high-demand occupations. The list is available here and includes healthcare, education, media, engineering, and high tech opportunities.

 Covered education programs must provide training for a high-demand occupation. GI Bill approved programs of education, excluding bachelor’s and graduate degrees, and VET TEC approved training programs are eligible.

 Effective April 4, VA will begin working with education institutions to identify eligible training programs and complete VRRAP participation agreements. VA will publish a comprehensive list of approved VRRAP educational institutions and programs on its website to ensure that Veterans know what training opportunities are available under the program.

 VA has 17,250 training spots open for eligible Veterans and will soon announce additional details on how Veterans can apply to participate in VRRAP.

 If you have any questions, please contact the Education Call Center at 888-442-4551 between 7 a.m. – 6 p.m. Central Time, Monday-Friday to speak with a representative. 

Month of the Military Child 2021

Month of the Military Child 2021

April is designated as Month of the Military Child – a time to honor the sacrifices made by military families worldwide, with an emphasis on the experience of the dependent children of military members serving at home and overseas.

Like many similar military recognition efforts, the Month of The Military Child is often celebrated “internally” with military communities and military association planning contests, parades, fairs, seminars, and special events centered around the message of the month. It is also celebrated “externally” by many communities, schools, and organizations.

Approximately 2 million military children have experienced a parental deployment since 9/11. There are currently 1.2 million military children of active-duty members worldwide.  The average military family moves three times more often than their civilian counterpart.  There are nearly two million “total-force dependent children” including more than 900 thousand Army dependents, 400,000 Air Force dependents, nearly 300,000 Navy and approximately 118,000 Marine dependents.

Since many of the April events are sponsored by military communities, to learn more it is best to start your search for events with the base Public Affairs office, Military Family Readiness Centers, Department of Defense Dependent School admin offices, and even on-base Child Development Centers.