INDEPENDENCE DAY  –  JULY 4th

INDEPENDENCE DAY – JULY 4th

The Fourth of July—also known as Independence Day or July 4th—has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution.

On July 2nd, 1776, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later delegates from the 13 colonies adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson.

The first recorded use of the name “Independence Day” was not until 1791 and Independence Day celebrations only became common after the War of 1812.  By the 1870’s. Independence Day had become the most important secular holiday on the American calendar and has transformed into what is known as the 4th of July today.

From 1776 to the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with festivities ranging from fireworks, parades, and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues.

78th Anniversary of D-Day

78th Anniversary of D-Day

June marks the 78th Anniversary of D-Day in Normandy.  We will always remember and never forget the sacrifices and valor exhibited by our armed forces on June 6, 1944.

On D-Day Allied forces launched a combined naval, air and land assault on Nazi-occupied France.  The invasion is significant in history for the role it played in World War II.  During World War II (1939-1945), the Battle of Normandy, which lasted from June 1944 to August 1944, resulted in the Allied liberation of Western Europe from Nazi Germany’s control. Codenamed Operation Overlord, the battle began when some 5,000 ships, 11,000 airplanes, and 156,000 American, British, and Canadian servicemen landed on five beaches along a 50-mile stretch of the heavily fortified coast of France’s Normandy region. When it was over, the Allied Forces had suffered nearly 10,000 casualties; more than 4,000 were dead.  Yet somehow, due to planning and preparation, and due to the valor, fidelity, and sacrifice of the Allied Forces, Fortress Europe had been breached.

The invasion was one of the largest amphibious military assaults in history and required extensive planning. Prior to D-Day, the Allies conducted a large-scale deception campaign designed to mislead the Germans about the intended invasion target. By late August 1944, all northern France had been liberated, and by the following spring the Allies had defeated the Germans. The Normandy landings have been called the beginning of the end of war in Europe.

Annual Memorial Day Observance at Frisco Commons Park

Annual Memorial Day Observance at Frisco Commons Park

On Monday, May 30 join the City of Frisco, the Frisco Garden Club, and Frisco VFW Post 8273 for a Memorial Day Observance at Frisco Commons, 8000 McKinney Road.

The event will feature a traditional flag and wreath laying ceremony, patriotic music, and participation from local scouts. The Frisco Garden Club and the VFW have been coordinating Memorial Day services in Frisco since 1994.

Post 178 Honor Guard and the VFW Guard to raise the Colors at 9 A.M.

National Vietnam War Veterans Day

National Vietnam War Veterans Day

Vietnam Veterans Day commemorates the sacrifices of Vietnam veterans and their families and is part of a national effort to recognize the men and women who were denied a proper welcome upon returning home more than 40 years ago.

The Vietnam War Veterans Recognition Act, which was signed into law in 2017, designates March 29 of each year as National Vietnam War Veterans Day.  It is not an official holiday.  Most states celebrate “Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day” on March 29 or 30 of each year. Though there is some debate, March 29 is generally viewed as a more appropriate date.  On that day in 1973, the last combat troops were withdrawn from Vietnam and the last prisoners of war held in North Vietnam arrived on American soil.

Lasting from 1955 to 1975, the Vietnam war engulfed the Southeast Asian country of Vietnam, as well as its neighboring countries, Cambodia and Laos.  It resulted in several million deaths, most of whom were Vietnamese civilians.  The conflict began during the 1950s when the struggle between the country’s communist northern part and the anti-communist south escalated. The United States began its military involvement to back the South’s effort to quell the communist onslaught, which, at the height of the Cold War, was feared to promote the spread of communist ideology and influence worldwide.  During the war, about 500,000 US troops were dispatched to Southeast Asia, about 58,000 of whom were killed.  The conflict ended in 1975 with the fall of Saigon and the victory of North Vietnam.

More than 350 members of American Legion Post 178 are Vietnam veterans.

NATIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR DAY

NATIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR DAY

National Medal of Honor Day on March 25th recognizes all Medal of Honor recipients.

On March 25, 1863, Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton presented the first Medals of Honor (Army) to six members of the “Andrews Raiders” for their volunteering and participation during an American Civil War raid in April of 1862.

Created in 1861, the Medal of Honor is the United States of America’s highest military honor.  It is awarded only to US military personnel by the President of the United States in the name of Congress for personal acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty.  There are three versions of the Medal of Honor: one for the Army, one for the Navy and one for the Air Force, with personnel of the Marine Corps and the Coast Guard receiving the Navy version.

Since its creation, there have been 3,468 Medals of Honor awarded to the country’s soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, and coastguardsmen.

Two Medal of Honor recipients are interred at the DFW National Cemetery:  Candelario Garcia, (1944-2013) for action in the Vietnam War, and James L. Stone (1922-2012) for action in the Korea War.